Australia vs. Netherlands

Topics: Netherlands, Dutch people, Australia Pages: 10 (3233 words) Published: September 21, 2013
Report on the cultural differences between Australia and the Netherlands
Assignment 1: Cross-Cultural Dimensions

Describe the effect of the cross-cultural dimensions of both Hofstede and Trompenaars on two subjects for both your home country as the country of your internship Trompenaars
Australia
1. Universalism vs. particularism
2. Individualism vs. collectivism
3. Neutral vs. emotional
4. Specific vs. diffuse
5. Achievement vs. ascription
6. Sequential vs. synchronic
7. Internal vs. external control
Leadership
Leadership in Australia is very much based on rules. Therefore, clear instructions are given to the employees at all time, so that every single employee knows what he or she has to do. Because of the individualism, people all work for themselves. Together, however, they make sure the organisation’s result is positive. Group work is not really integrated in the Australian culture. Australians have the perception, because of their neutral character, that people can work together perfectly, without bonding in their personal lives. All of the above leads to a straight leadership. A manager talks to his or her employees to tell them what they have to do individually. No groups have to be monitored, so the manager can really concentrate on his own task and organise the workforce per individual. Organisational culture

The organisational culture in Australia is also based on this individualism. As mentioned under ‘leadership’, Australian people mainly work individually. They believe that people should take their own decisions and must be self-reliant within a business and not dependent on managers or colleagues. Furthermore, the organisation is very strict. It is a loose and indirect organisation up to a certain extent. The communication between people within the organisation is very informal and direct. At the same time, the whole organisation is based on rules. Rules are more important than relationships according to the Australian culture.

Netherlands
1. Universalism vs. particularism
2. Individualism vs. collectivism
3. Neutral vs. emotional
4. Specific vs. diffuse
5. Achievement vs. ascription
6. Sequential vs. synchronic
7. Internal vs. external control
Leadership
The Dutch leadership is based on the universalism, in other words on strict rules. Everything is determined with rules. However, the atmosphere at the working place is not strict. The communication from manager to employees is direct and formal. Employees know exactly what they are up to and can work on their work individually. Leaders trust their employees in this, they count on their employees to be self-reliant and independent in their work. Furthermore, Dutch managers work with strict deadlines. The Dutch culture is very much based on punctuality. They eat at 6 o’clock, they go to sleep at 11 o’clock. The same counts in the business-life. When a task is given to you, you are to make sure it is finished before the deadline set. Whenever possible, leaders give their employees reassurance that they are doing a good job. Employees also need this positive feedback to boost their self-confidence, which gives them a positive ‘get-up-and-go’ attitude. Good performance is appreciated and rewarded. Organisational culture

The organisational culture is mainly individual. The Dutch people want every single person to be happy. Therefore, they tend to give feedback all the time to boost self-confidence, they let everybody do their say in a discussion, etc. Furthermore, everybody is expected to have their work done before the set deadline. Dutch people are very punctual and therefore do not like people who show up late at meetings or who hand in their work too late. Next to these strict...

Bibliography: Websites
Austrade. (2012, March 23). Doing Business in the Netherlands. Retrieved May 21, 2012, from Austrade: http://www.austrade.gov.au/Doing-business-in-the-Netherlands/default.aspx
Itim. (n.d.). Geert Hofstede. Retrieved May 21, 2012, from Geert Hofstede: http://geert-hofstede.com/
John Daly, S. S. (2004). Nursing Leadership. Retrieved May 21, 2012, from Google Books: http://books.google.nl/books?id=TrN3ZS0CNQcC&pg=PA28&lpg=PA28&dq=Trompenaars+Australia&source=bl&ots=mrfFE84Iuj&sig=Tqy2bx--eE6UhcfvYTqI7uKuNFc&hl=nl&sa=X&ei=O267T7XBEoWP-wbvpqjUDA&ved=0CGIQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=Trompenaars%20Australia&f=false
Meehan, C. L. (2012). Flat Vs. Hierarchical Organizational Structure. Retrieved May 22, 2012, from Small Business: http://smallbusiness.chron.com/flat-vs-hierarchical-organizational-structure-724.html
Mindtools. (n.d.). The Seven Dimensions of Culture. Retrieved May 21, 2012, from Mindtools: http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/seven-dimensions.htm
Sagepub. (2006, July 13). Dimensions of Culture. Retrieved May 22, 2012, from Sagepub : http://www.sagepub.com/upm-data/11711_Chapter7.pdf
Books
Schemerhorn, J. R. (2010). Introduction to Management 10th edition.
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